random: 10musicCAMPYicons

SPICE GIRLS

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CHER

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ABBA

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POISON

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PRINCE

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TWISTED SISTERS

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STRYPER

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VILLAGE PEOPLE

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ALICE COOPER

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BETTE MIDLER

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http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/Camp_style/id/1944073

camp into charity: Fiorucci’s latest t-shirt

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Nel 2008, cbm Italia sostiene e promuove l’iniziativa 100 anni X 100 testimonial X 100 progetti. Tante personaggi importanti provenienti dal mondo dello spettacolo, dello sport, della cultura e dell’imprenditoria italiana presteranno la loro immagine a supporto dei  100 progetti per aiutare cbm a comunicarli e a raccogliere così i fondi necessari a sostenerli. Tanti sono gli ambasciatori di cbm che hanno deciso di prestare la loro immagine. Tra gli altri Elio Fiorucci.

 Il noto stilista ha scelto di essere il testimonial dei progetti di cbm in Myanmar (ex Birmania), paese duramente colpito dall’uragano Nargis, dove cbm supporta un progetto oculistico di eccellenza.

Elio Fiorucci ha deciso di vestire i 100 anni di cbm nella lotta alla cecità realizzando una T shirt Braille ispirata al celebre film di Charlie ChaplinLuci della città”.

 

 

 

t-shirt ” Love is Possible” by Elio Fiorucci.

Acquiring this t-shirt you contribute to help cbm Italy onlus an association not profit that it is taken care of the problem of the blindness in the world. All the proceeds will come entire devolven at association.

Elio Fiorucci has chosen a Charlie Chaplin’s subject: the characters of City Lights

 www.cbmitalia.org

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City Lights is a 1931 American silent comedy film written, directed by, and starring Charlie Chaplin

The plot concerns Chaplin’s Tramp, broke and homeless, meeting a poor blind girl (Virginia Cherrill) selling flowers on the streets and falling in love with her. The blind girl mistakes him for a millionaire and, because he doesn’t want to disappoint her, he keeps up the charade…

 

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the campy link between DALI’ and WARHOL: ULTRAVIOLET

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Underground celebrity Ultra Violet was born Isabelle Collin Dufresne in 1935 in France, a convent-raised French bourgeois heiress. A coiffured society deb in those days, she moved to New York in 1953 where she spent a decade surrounding herself with artists like John Graham, John Chamberlain, and Salvador Dalí, the last with whom triggered her career as a painter. It was through her relationship with Dali that she eventually met pop icon Andy Warhol in the early 1960’s and changed her name to Ultra Violet, evolving into one of Warhol’s more accessible and unforgettable trashy-chic East 47th Street “Factory” superstars.

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Theda Bara and went on to appear in Warhol’s The Life of Juanita Castro (1965) and I, a Man (1967) before her cameo inclusions in other now-cult films. Her best-selling 1988 autobiography “Famous for Fifteen Minutes: My Years with Andy Warhol” detailed her rise in celebrity, and her play “You Are What You Eat” was performed in Czechoslovakia in 1992. As a visual artist with political and spiritual overtones, her mixed-media works have been displayed worldwide. She opened an art studio in Nice in 1990, creating a movement called “L’Ultratique,” publishing two manifestos in the early 1990’s. Her work was included in the Audart exhibition that commemorated the tenth anniversary of Warhol’s death. A bi-continental resident, Ultra Violet currently divides her time between her studio in Nice and her penthouse apartment in Manhattan.

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http://www.ultravioletweb.com/mickeylogist.html

http://www.ultravioletweb.com/pistol/

 

 

 

 

GEORGE BARBIER – La Nascita Del Déco –

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   8. Camp is a vision of the world in terms of style — but a particular kind of style. It is the love of the exaggerated, the “off,” of things-being-what-they-are-not. The best example is in Art Nouveau, the most typical and fully developed Camp style. Art Nouveau objects, typically, convert one thing into something else: the lighting fixtures in the form of flowering plants, the living room which is really a grotto. A remarkable example: the Paris Métro entrances designed by Hector Guimard in the late 1890s in the shape of cast-iron orchid stalks. 

Notes on Camp, Susan Sontag, 1964

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George Barbier (1882 – 1932) was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century. Born in Nantes France on October 10, 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre and ballet costumes, to illustrate books, and to produce haute couture fashion illustrations. For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecole des Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue as “The Knights of the Bracelet” – a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress. Included in this élite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were his first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin. During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton. In the mid 1920s he worked with Erté to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergère and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erté’s acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances in L’Illustration magazine. Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success.

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http://www.museiciviciveneziani.it/frame.asp?pid=1589&musid=148&sezione=mostre

influence on PopCamp: Salvador DALI’

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Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989) was a Spanish Catalan surrealist painter born in Figueres.

Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance masters. His best-known work, The Persistence of Memory, was completed in 1931. Dalí’s expansive artistic repertoire includes film, sculpture, and photography in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of mediums.

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Dalí attributed his “love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes”to a self-styled “Arab lineage,” claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors.

Widely considered to be greatly imaginative, Dalí had an affinity for partaking in unusual behavior to draw attention to himself. This sometimes irked those who loved his art as much as it annoyed his critics, since his eccentric manner sometimes drew more public attention than his artwork.

 

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Dalí, a colorful and imposing presence in his ever-present long cape, walking stick, haughty expression, and upturned waxed mustache, was famous for having said that “every morning upon awakening, I experience a supreme pleasure: that of being Salvador Dalí.” The entertainer Cher and her husband Sonny Bono, when young, came to a party at Dalí’s expensive residence in New York’s Plaza Hotel and were startled when Cher sat down on an oddly shaped sexual vibrator left in an easy chair.

When interviewed by Mike Wallace on his 60 Minutes television show, Dalí kept referring to himself in the third person, and told the startled Mr. Wallace matter-of-factly that “Dalí is immortal and will not die.” During another television appearance, on the Tonight Show, Dalí carried with him a leather rhinoceros and refused to sit upon anything else.

 

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One of Dalí’s most unorthodox artistic creations may have been an entire person. At a French nightclub in 1965, Dalí met Amanda Lear, a fashion model then known as Peki D’Oslo.

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanda_Lear )

Lear became his protégé and muse, writing about their affair in the authorized biography My Life With Dalí (1986). Transfixed by the mannish, larger-than-life Lear, Dalí masterminded her successful transition from modeling to the music world, advising her on self-presentation and helping spin mysterious stories about her origin as she took the disco-art scene by storm. According to Lear, she and Dalí were united in a “spiritual marriage” on a deserted mountaintop. Referred to as Dalí’s “Frankenstein,” some believe Lear’s name is a pun on the French “L’Amant Dalí,” or Lover of Dalí. Lear took the place of an earlier muse, Ultra Violet (Isabelle Collin Dufresne), who had left Dalí’s side to join The Factory of Andy Warhol.

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Late in his career, Dalí did not confine himself to painting, but experimented with many unusual or novel media and processes: he made bulletist works and was among the first artists to employ holography in an artistic manner. Several of his works incorporate optical illusions. In his later years, young artists such as Andy Warhol proclaimed Dalí an important influence on pop art.

http://www.virtualdali.com

campy works from a campy life: ANDY WARHOL

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Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987), more commonly known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist and a figure in the movement known as pop art. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter, avant-garde filmmaker, record producer, author, and public figure known for his membership in wildly diverse social circles that included bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy aristocrats.

Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films since his death in 1987.

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Many people think of Warhol as “asexual” and merely a “voyeur”, but these notions have been debunked by biographers (such as Victor Bockris), explored by other members of The Factory scene such as Bob Colacello (in his book Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up), and by scholars like art historian Richard Meyer (in his book Outlaw Representation). The question of how Warhol’s sexuality influenced his work and shaped his relationship to the art world is a major subject of scholarship on the artist, and is an issue that Warhol himself addressed in interviews, in conversation with his contemporaries, and in his publications (e.g. Popism: The Warhol Sixties).

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Throughout his career, Warhol produced erotic photography and drawings of male nudes and one rare one of a woman “pati palomeras”. Many of his most famous works (portraits of Liza Minnelli, Judy Garland, and Elizabeth Taylor, and films like Blow Job, My Hustler, and Lonesome Cowboys) draw from gay underground culture and/or openly explore the complexity of sexuality and desire. Many of his films premiered in gay porn theaters. That said, some stories about Warhol’s development as an artist revolved around the obstacle his sexuality initially presented as he tried to launch his career. The first works that he submitted to a gallery in the pursuit of a career as an artist were homoerotic drawings of male nudes. They were rejected for being too openly gay.

In Popism, furthermore, the artist recalls a conversation with the film maker Emile de Antonio about the difficulty Warhol had being accepted socially by the then more famous (but closeted) gay artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. De Antonio explained that Warhol was “too swish and that upsets them.” In response to this, Warhol writes, “There was nothing I could say to that. It was all too true. So I decided I just wasn’t going to care, because those were all the things that I didn’t want to change anyway, that I didn’t think I ‘should’ want to change … Other people could change their attitudes but not me”. In exploring Warhol’s biography, many turn to this period – the late 1950s and early 1960s – as a key moment in the development of his persona. Some have suggested that his frequent refusal to comment on his work, to speak about himself (confining himself in interviews to responses like “Um, No” and “Um, Yes”, and often allowing others to speak for him), and even the evolution of his Pop style can be traced to the years when Warhol was first dismissed by the inner circles of the New York art world.

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Pop Art was an experimental form that several artists were independently adopting; some of these pioneers, such as Roy Lichtenstein, would later become synonymous with the movement. Warhol, who would become famous as the “Pope of Pop,” turned to this new style, where popular subjects could be part of the artist’s palette.

To him, part of defining a niche was defining his subject matter. Cartoons were already being used by Lichtenstein, typography by Jasper Johns, and so on; Warhol wanted a distinguishing subject. His friends suggested he should paint the things he loved the most. In his signature way of taking things literally, for his first major exhibition he painted his famous cans of Campbell’s Soup, which he claimed to have had for lunch for most of his life. The work sold for $10,000 at an auction on November 17, 1971 at Sotheby’s New York, which is a minimal amount for the artist whose paintings sell for over $6 million more recently.

He loved celebrities, so he painted them as well. From these beginnings he developed his later style and subjects. Instead of working on a signature subject matter, as he started out to do, he worked more and more on a signature style, slowly eliminating the hand-made from the artistic process. Warhol frequently used silk-screening; his later drawings were traced from slide projections. Warhol went from being a painter to being a designer of paintings. At the height of his fame as a painter, Warhol had several assistants who produced his silk-screen multiples, following his directions to make different versions and variations.

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http://www.warholstars.org/filmch/warhol/camp.html

http://www.warhol.org/

http://www.mmfa.qc.ca/micro_sites/warhol/expo_en.html

only twice-campy BEPPE RIBOLI

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The creator of  Q-i Clubbing (Brescia), Fura (Brescia) and many other discos, an artist who’s never dealt with Camp style, but twice..

ZANG

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1992/2008 CREMA (CR)

 

“Lo Zang è il mio laboratorio permanente, dove sperimento in scala reale quello che mi gira per la testa. In quindici anni l’ho rifatto quindici volte, sempre a costi bassissimi, e ogni anno è nuovo, dirompente, all’avanguardia. Devo ringraziare mio fratello Pietro, che pazientemente mi permette ogni anno di intervenire con le mie idee.”

“The Zang is my permanent laboratory, where I try out on a full scale whatever comes into my head. In fifteen years I have redone
it fifteen times, always at very low cost, and every year it’s new, breath-taking, on the cutting edge. For this I have to thank
my brother Pietro, who patiently allows me to experiment with
my ideas every year.”

( from www.bepperiboli.com )

Another work:

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Era Volgare
1993 JESOLO (Venezia)

A Jesolo, nella centralissima piazza Mazzini, il progetto possiede tre elementi fortissimi. La porta-vagina, realizzata in gommapiuma e sky rosso, a membrane, è illuminata con neon rossi. Il banco bar, in vetroresina, avvolge il locale con gli enormi ditoni che, sollevandosi in verticale, diventano anche elementi luce; nel mezzo del banco bar una grande margherita simboleggia l’oggetto sessuale. Le pareti sono ricoperte con tappezzeria (realizzata per l’occasione) dai colori pop molto decisi, con il disegno di un maialino ripetuto per duemiladuecento volte.

Located at Jesolo, in the city’s central Piazza Mazzini, the project possesses three very strong elements. The vagina-shaped door is made of foam rubber and red fake leather membranes, and it is illuminated with red neon lights. The bar counter, in fibreglass, wraps the place with its enormous fingers that, rising vertically, turn into lighting elements; a large daisy in the middle of the bar symbolizes the sexual object. The walls are covered with (specially made) wallpaper in very strong Pop colours, with a piglet repeated two thousand two hundred times as the pattern.